The Portal to Texas History 2017 Research Fellowship Awardee - Brian Elliott

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Brian Elliot is a Ph.D. Student and Teaching Fellow with the History Department at the University of North Texas. Brian’s research focuses on slavery during the Civil War, and the legacy of former slaves as “Black Confederates.” Brian’s published materials include his Master’s thesis “Peculiar Pairings: Texas Confederates and their Black Body Servants," as well as a number of published book reviews. Brian has presented his research at several conferences, including at the Society for Military History, and the Southwest Social Science Association, and has given informal talks on his research and the utility of digital resources in historical research.

The Portal to Texas History 2017 Research Fellowship Awardee - Heather Sinclair

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Heather Sinclair has a background in professional midwifery and activism and received her Ph.D. in history in 2016 from the University of Texas at El Paso.  Her dissertation is entitled "Birth City: Race and Violence in the History of Childbirth and Midwifery in the El Paso-Ciudad Juárez Borderlands, 1907-2013."  She is currently a lecturer in history and women’s studies at the University of Texas at El Paso.  She received a B.A. in history and certificate in women’s studies from Duke University.

The Portal to Texas History 2017 Research Fellowship Awardee - Robin Roe

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Robin Roe is a doctoral candidate at Texas A&M University and received her BA and MA in History from Texas A&M University. Her dissertation examines how media used weather-related natural disasters in Texas and the Southwest border region in the early Twentieth Century to manipulate public perceptions of race, ethnicity, immigration status, gender, and class, and how some of those victims contested that manipulation. She is a veteran of the U. S. Air Force and has worked as a copy editor and in the computer industry before beginning her graduate work. She is particularly interested in the potential of digital humanities for historical research.

The UNT Special Collections 2017 Research Fellowship Awardee - Matthew Carr

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Matthew Carr is a student in Columbia University’s political science Ph.D .program. His research focuses on American political institutions. He's working on a project – which makes extensive use of archival resources – collecting state-level political party platforms from 1960 through the present day, in order to trace the evolution of party development. 

The Portal to Texas History 2017 Research Fellowship Awardee - Tiffany J. González

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Tiffany J. González grew up in Chicago, Illinois, and in North Richland Hills, Texas. Currently she is a doctoral candidate in the department of history at Texas A&M University. She earned both her bachelor’s and master’s degree in History from Texas Tech University. In the 2017-2018 academic year, Tiffany will conduct more research and begin the writing phase for the dissertation. Her work has received support from the Texas State Historical Association, the East Texas Historical Association, the Texas Association of Chicanos in Higher Education, and now the Portal to Texas History.

The Portal to Texas History 2017 Research Fellowship Awardee - Gregg Cantrell

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Gregg Cantrell holds the Erma and Ralph Lowe Chair in Texas History at Texas Christian University. He is the author of several books and articles, including Stephen F. Austin: Empresario of Texas.  He is a coauthor of the bestselling Texas History textbook, The History of Texas, coauthored with Robert A. Calvert and Arnoldo De León.  In 2013-2014 he was president of the Texas State Historical Association, and he is a member of the Texas Institute of Letters.

The UNT Special Collections 2017 Research Fellowship Awardee - Laura Lee Oviedo

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Laura Lee Oviedo is a native of Pharr, Texas and is currently a Ph.D. student of history at Texas A&M University. Laura’s dissertation employs a comparative framework to examine the Militarization of Mexican and Puerto Rican Women’s Lives during World War II and the Politics of Race, Class, Gender, and Citizenship.

The Portal to Texas History 2016 Research Fellowship Awardee - David J. Cameron

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David J. Cameron is a doctoral candidate in Chicano/Latino and Twentieth-Century United States History at Texas A&M University His project Race and Religion in the Bayou City: Latino/a, African American, and Anglo Baptists in Houston’s Long Civil Rights Movement​ ​examines how the intersections of race and religion in the Bayou City shaped Houston-area Baptists’ participation in the struggle for civil rights through religious associations, churches, and leaders.