A win for Google and for libraries, a bigger win still to come? Perhaps…

Today, Judge Chen in the United States District Court in the Southern District of New York held that Google’s scanning of over twenty million books for research purposes, snippet views, data mining, text mining, bibliographic research, etymological research,  to aid in viewing for handicapped… is fair use.

Authors Denied Class Status in Google Digital Books Case, Lower Court Must First Decide Fair Use Issue

On Monday, July 1, the United States Court of Appeals for the Second Circuit held that the authors who are a party to this suit may not be allowed to file a class action lawsuit against Google. The intermediate court reasoned that the lower court first needs to decide whether Google’s scanning of print books for the purposes of research, preview, and indexing is a fair use.

Open access publishing and the University of North Texas Open Access symposium titled “Futures of Academic Publishing: UNT's 4th Symposium on Open Access”

In light of the University of North Texas Open Access symposium titled “Futures of Academic Publishing: UNT's 4th Symposium on Open Access,” which will occur May 30-31st, it is apropos to mention a couple of recent developments in open access publishing and dissemination models. EThOS, for example, is an open access electronic theses online service operated by the British Library.