Three Questions is an initiative to share the value that our faculty, students, and others in the UNT community derive from using The Portal to Texas History at UNT Libraries.


1. How important are Unique Collections in your teaching, learning or research?

The Portal has been hugely helpful in my research, since it has put so many primary, contemporary historical materials online.

2. How have Unique Collections changed the way you approach your research, teaching or learning?  

By making archival materials searchable and viewable over the Internet, it’s made the job of researching Texas history more rapid, convenient and comprehensive.

3. What do you want others to know about your research, teaching or learning?

I am involved in learning about Texas environmental history and sharing what I have discovered, through interviews and spoken word (please see texaslegacy.org and The Texas Legacy Project: Stories of Courage and Conservation), and through mapping and other visual materials (please see texaslandscape.org and The Texas Landscape Project: Nature and People).

David Todd works on conservation efforts in Texas, as an author, environmental attorney, hydrologist, and rancher.  He enriches environmental education as the founder and coordinator of the Conservation History Association of Texas, which has assembled an oral history archive of 225 conservationists in the state (texaslegacy.org), including a set of interview recordings, edited documentaries and set of rich media files. Todd and his co-editor, David Weisman, created a book of excerpts from these oral histories, The Texas Legacy Project: Stories of Courage and Conservation (Texas A&M University Press, 2010). Todd and his co-author Jonathan Ogren, also completed a 300-map atlas of the state’s environmental history (texaslandscape.org), entitled The Texas LandscapeProject: Views of Natural and Built Worlds (Texas A&M University Press 2016). David holds degrees from Princeton University (B.A., Architecture and Urban Planning – cum laude), Rice University, Brown School of Engineering (M.S., Environmental Science), and Emory University, School of Law (J.D., School of Law).