Learn about the history of the Rescuing Texas History Mini-Grant Program at UNT Libraries.

The University of North Texas Libraries are proud to unveil Mean Green Mapped!

Mean Green Mapped is an interactive web map utilizing GIS software to illustrate UNT’s history through photographs and other media. Using historic maps, aerials and photographs, we seek to generate interest in the resources available at UNT Libraries and to commemorate UNT’s 125 years of service to students and community. 

On February 15, 2018, UNT Libraries celebrated the one-millionth item uploaded to The Portal to Texas History with the addition of a Dutch map of the Gulf of Mexico dating from 1680.

The calendar has turned to April, another month has passed and our swiftly-moving home planet has moved another 47.94 million miles around the sun.

Diane Bruxvoort has joined us as Dean of Libraries. 

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Dr. Kenna Lang Archer is an instructor at Angelo State University in San Angelo, Texas, where she teaches U.S. environmental history, Texas history and American history. Her first book, Unruly Waters, was published by University of New Mexico Press. She recently finished writing an updated edition of Ogallala: Water for a Dry Land  with John Opie and Char Miller. She will be presenting her current research project at the Western History Association meeting in October. 

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Agatha Beins teaches in the Department of Multicultural Women's and Gender Studies at Texas Woman's University. Her book Liberation in Print: Feminist Periodicals and Social Movement Identity analyzes US feminist newsletters and newspapers published in the 1970s. In addition to her interest in feminist print cultures, she writes and teaches about the relationship between art and activism, feminist pedagogies, the institutionalization of women's studies, and food studies. She also serves as editor for the online, open access journal Films for the Feminist Classroom.

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Ms. Giselle Greenidge is a doctoral student in the Department of Sociology. Her major concentration is Global and Comparative Sociology and her minor concentration is Social Stratification. Ms. Greenidge is a teaching fellow at UNT, and her research interests include culture, globalization, and immigration. 
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Dr. Kenna Lang Archer is an instructor at Angelo State University in San Angelo, Texas, where she teaches U.S. environmental history, Texas history, and American history. Her first book, Unruly Waters, was published by University of New Mexico Press. She recently finished writing an updated edition of Ogallala: Water for a Dry Land with John Opie and Char Miller. She will be presenting her current research project at the Western History Association meeting in October. 

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Kimberly Jackson is a master’s student and Teaching Assistant in the History Department at the University of North Texas. She earned a bachelor’s degree in history and mathematics at the University of North Texas. In the 2018-2019 academic school year, Kimberly will complete her thesis on the Civilian Conservation Corps in Big Bend National Park. Her larger academic interests include borderlands and environmental history and hopes to apply her research to larger studies of the U.S.-Mexico Border.

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Richard B. McCaslin, TSHA Endowed Professor of Texas History at the University of North Texas, is the author or editor of eighteen books. One of the best known is Tainted Breeze: The Great Hanging at Gainesville, Texas, October 1862, which won the Tullis Prize and an AASLH commendation.  He also wrote Lee in the Shadow of Washington, which received the Laney Prize and the Slatten Award, and was nominated for a Pulitzer.  Another book, At the Heart of Texas: One Hundred Years of the Texas State Historical Association, 1897-1997, earned the Award of Merit from the Texas Philosophical Society.  Yet another, Fighting Stock: John S. "Rip" Ford in Texas, received the Pate Award and Bates Award. 

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Scot McFarlane grew up in Concord, Massachusetts, and Palestine, Texas near the Trinity River.  Currently a Ph.D. Candidate at Columbia University, his work has appeared in The Journal of Southern History and Environmental History.  At Columbia, Scot has helped teach Mexican History, the History of the South, the History of New York, and is currently drafting a syllabus for a seminar on the history of rivers in North America.  Prior to moving to NYC, Scot taught writing and history at high schools in the Willamette River Valley of Oregon.  You can follow his research on his blog

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Shay O'Brien is a second-year Sociology student at Princeton studying elites and conservatives in the United States. Her areas of interest include economic sociology, elite sociology, race & ethnicity, and religion. Before beginning graduate school, Shay worked on a large-scale randomized control trial at the social policy research firm MDRC. She graduated from Brown University with a B.A. in Anthropology, where she was a research assistant in the Anthropology department and won the prizes for Best Honors Thesis and Highest Achievement in Linguistic Anthropology. 

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Born and raised in the state of Texas, Jessica Webb received her Bachelor’s degree in History from Austin College in 2012. In 2014, she obtained her Master’s Degree in American History from TCU in Fort Worth and is working towards her Ph.D. there as well. Her research interests focus on the intersections of gender and sexuality and entrepreneurship within the framework of prostitution. She has been the recipient of several awards including the Boller Dissertation Fellowship and the Erwin E. Smith Research Fellowship.

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Dr. Kenneth Hafertepe grew up in Dallas, then attended Georgetown University in Washington, D.C. His graduate work was in American Civilization at the University of Texas at Austin. Since 2000, Dr. Hafertepe has taught in the Department of Museum Studies at Baylor University. He has written six books, co-edited two more, and has written many articles on American and Texan material culture.

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Dr. Evelyn Montgomery is the Director of Curatorial Affairs at Dallas Heritage Village, an outdoor museum that contains two of the cabins recorded by Dr. Jordan. She holds degrees in architecture and history, with a particular interest in American houses and domestic life, particularly for Victorians and on the frontier. She frequently presents on these subjects to both academic and popular audiences. She supports historic preservation through volunteer efforts, service on the Dallas Landmark Commission, and the maintenance and interpretation of the buildings of Dallas Heritage Village. 

This Special Collections exhibit will introduce you to some of these interesting new items, and show off the amazing variety of our holdings.

Willis Library | Sarah T. Hughes Reading Room, Room 437
Tuesday, January 16, 2018 - 9:00am to Friday, August 10, 2018 - 5:00pm

Software Carpentry will host a two day workshop in Willis Library, Room 443 from 8:30 a.m. - 4:30 p.m. Tuesday, June 5 and Wednesday, June 6. The workshop will focus on teaching computing skills to students and faculty, specifically those wishing to use computer programming in their research.

Willis Library | Room 443
Tuesday, June 5, 2018 - 8:30am to Wednesday, June 6, 2018 - 4:30pm

UNT's Open Access Symposium 2018 will be held June 6–7, 2018, at the University of North Texas Health Science Center in Fort Worth in conjunction with the 

| UNT Health Science Center, Fort Worth
Wednesday, June 6, 2018 (All day) to Thursday, June 7, 2018 (All day)

Please join us to hear Giselle Greenidge, a UNT Special Collections 2018 Research Fellowship Awardee, speak about her current research.

Willis Library | Room 443
Thursday, June 28, 2018 -
10:00am to 11:00am