The UNT Libraries and Digital Frontiers invite you to a webchat with

Marvin Taylor

Director, The Fales Library & Special Collections
New York University

"The Audience is the Archive: How Performance Has Changed Our Notions of Special Collections"

Marvin Taylor is Director of The Fales Library and Special Collections at New York University. An activist archivist known as “the man who taught us how to file a leather jacket,” Marvin is the founding curator of The Downtown Collection, a collection dedicated to documenting the literary, performance and art scene in downtown New York from the early 1970s to the present. The collection includes the papers of downtown luminaries Richard Hell, David Wojnarowicz, and Dennis Cooper, the archives of zines like Between C & D and Redtape, and rare film, video, and ephemera. The exhibition The Downtown Show debuted at NYU's Grey Gallery in 2006 and traveled to the Andy Warhol Museum and the Austin Museum of Art. Marvin edited the accompanying volume The Downtown Book (Princeton UP, 2006), which includes essays by Ann Magnuson, Michael Musto, and Lydia Lunch, among others. Marvin has also been instrumental in the growth of the Fales Food & Cookery Collection, which documents "food and foodways with a particular emphasis on New York City." In 2009, Marvin acquired the Gourmet magazine collection, making Fales the largest cookbook archive in America. Because of his dedication to preserving alternative artifacts and at-risk magnetic media, Marvin's influence extends beyond the archives into historical and fine art museums, and other cultural memory institutions.

The event is free and open to the public. To attend online, please register at:
https://attendee.gototraining.com/r/2038404763529589761

For information on visiting the UNT campus, including parking, visit UNT Parking & Transportation Services.

(This event is rescheduled from the April 3 talk that was snowed out.)

When

Friday, May 1, 2015 -
1:00pm to 2:00pm

Where

Willis Library
Willis Library Forum, Room 140

Contact