Dean's Innovative Grant

Growing expectation for digitized archival content means institutions must balance needs for access with quality metadata and embracing minimal description. For the NBC 5/KXAS television news collection, "minimal" description takes the form of keywords. Because employees have different areas of expertise and are not guided by a controlled vocabulary, description may reflect individual views of the material and its potential uses rather than metadata that is useful to other user groups.

The proposed project involves hosting an ACRL licensed workshop on “Intersections of Scholarly Communication and Information Literacy” aimed at developing collaborations and learning experiences for students, faculty, and staff interested in improving competencies in these areas or integrating them into their teaching or research.

Revving Up for Research's goal is to support Assistant Librarians from their initial appointment through their third year and help them build research skills and grow professionally. This is accomplished through group mentoring, where one mentor oversees several protégés and guides them in their professional development.

Academia meets happy hour in this effort to engage faculty with library resources and services with a backdrop of beer and hors d'oeuvres. The goal of this project was to promote faculty engagement with library resources on a local and global level through the use of two showcase-style events, one per long semester.

The first phase of this project focused largely on research and examining the relationships between libraries and their transgender patrons. In this second phase of the TX-Gender Project for Libraries, researchers explored how to better serve UNT’s transgender population by conducting focus groups and equipping librarians with the tools to make library resources accessible to everyone. It is centered on understanding this relationship between the Texas transgender community and librarians, specifically perceptions and information-seeking behaviors.

As prevalent as e-books and online streaming video are in the world of technology and education, there has been little research concerning their usefulness in an academic setting.This project aims to fill in those gaps by looking deeper into this particular area of research. The researchers incorporated the underutilized method of usability testing to understand how people really respond to these specific types of technology.

The UNT Digital Library is home to thousands of resources, measuring upwards of 38,000 items. The goal of this project was to determine if access and use of these numerous digital library collections would increase by creating and making catalog records available for items within the library.

The Federal Agencies Digitization Guidelines Initiative (FADGI) released a set of guidelines in October of 2015 concerning the digital imaging of cultural heritage objects. This project’s goal was to investigate these guidelines, bring UNT’s Digital Projects Unit up to federal standards, and promote collaboration across the nation.

Even in today’s technology-based world, people who are known as "digital natives" still prefer print books to e-books. E-books are perceived to be useful in an academic setting, but there are still gaps in this kind of research. This study aimed to understand and collect data on the usefulness of e-books and how students respond to them.

Documentaries offer a wealth of information and are an invaluable source of information for educators and casual viewers alike. UNT has a healthy collection of moving image archives that could prove very useful to documentary filmmakers as they compile their works. The goal of this project was to understand how documentary filmmakers get their information, and what role moving image archives play in their creative process.