Dean's Innovative Grant

The completely redesigned user interface of The Portal to Texas History has encouraged historians, genealogists, and everyday users to research their individual areas of interests. Internal user testing continues to uncover insights on how users interact with the Portal's vast catalog of public records, historical documents and artifacts.

Supporting sustainable practices is an important goal of the university as outlined in its mission statement and strategic planning. As our Faculty Delivery Service responds to greater demand, we are becoming more aware of the environmental impact our delivery materials (plastic poly mailers) have because they are neither recyclable nor reusable. Faculty members have expressed concerns about the long-tenn use of these materials, and some have opted out of using the service as a result.

African American male students have the highest attrition rate. In Fall 2017, a new living/learning community comprised of freshmen males will meet for a one-hour course focused on the African American experience in the United States examined through the lens of African American music.

Escape to the Library: A Library Learning Escape Room Experience was a successful and popular option during First Flight in 2016 that incorporated learning objectives tied to the ACRL Framework into a fun, immersive puzzle-solving experience.

Growing expectation for digitized archival content means institutions must balance needs for access with quality metadata and embracing minimal description. For the NBC 5/KXAS television news collection, "minimal" description takes the form of keywords. Because employees have different areas of expertise and are not guided by a controlled vocabulary, description may reflect individual views of the material and its potential uses rather than metadata that is useful to other user groups.

The proposed project involves hosting an ACRL licensed workshop on “Intersections of Scholarly Communication and Information Literacy” aimed at developing collaborations and learning experiences for students, faculty, and staff interested in improving competencies in these areas or integrating them into their teaching or research.

Revving Up for Research's goal is to support Assistant Librarians from their initial appointment through their third year and help them build research skills and grow professionally. This is accomplished through group mentoring, where one mentor oversees several protégés and guides them in their professional development.

Academia meets happy hour in this effort to engage faculty with library resources and services with a backdrop of beer and hors d'oeuvres. The goal of this project was to promote faculty engagement with library resources on a local and global level through the use of two showcase-style events, one per long semester.

The first phase of this project focused largely on research and examining the relationships between libraries and their transgender patrons. In this second phase of the TX-Gender Project for Libraries, researchers explored how to better serve UNT’s transgender population by conducting focus groups and equipping librarians with the tools to make library resources accessible to everyone. It is centered on understanding this relationship between the Texas transgender community and librarians, specifically perceptions and information-seeking behaviors.

As prevalent as e-books and online streaming video are in the world of technology and education, there has been little research concerning their usefulness in an academic setting.This project aims to fill in those gaps by looking deeper into this particular area of research. The researchers incorporated the underutilized method of usability testing to understand how people really respond to these specific types of technology.